Message boards : Sixtrack Application : Very short WU
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Hal Bregg
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Message 38737 - Posted: 7 May 2019, 19:41:19 UTC

I noticed that few WUs from newest batch of the new tasks are very, very short

Name	w-c0_0.000_job.B1inj_c0_0.000.3515__54__s__64.28_59.31__14.1_18.1__6__3_1_sixvf_boinc15814_0
Workunit	112300201
Run time	11 sec
CPU time	8 sec
Validate state	Valid
Credit	0.03
Device peak FLOPS	2.47 GFLOPS
Application version	SixTrack v502.05 (sse2)
windows_x86_64


I am curious why it takes less than a minute to run them.
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Profile Veronica
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Message 38738 - Posted: 7 May 2019, 20:33:51 UTC

From the job name it looks like the particles in that work unit have a large amplitude, so I expect they may have been lost in the simulation. When the particles are lost, the simulation stops early.

The simulations we send to BOINC are usually large scans of parameters, and a certain fraction of them will tend to be very short. This is just the nature of the studies we do.
SixTrack 5 Core Developer. github.com/SixTrack/SixTrack
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Message 38746 - Posted: 8 May 2019, 6:51:57 UTC

Thank you for clarification.
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Message 39135 - Posted: 15 Jun 2019, 20:21:59 UTC - in response to Message 38738.  
Last modified: 15 Jun 2019, 20:22:10 UTC

Hi Veronica, That was very symplectic of you to explain that to us. Now if I could just get my head around 6-dimensional ;-}
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Message 39475 - Posted: 1 Aug 2019, 6:50:47 UTC - in response to Message 39135.  

Hi Veronica, That was very symplectic of you to explain that to us. Now if I could just get my head around 6-dimensional ;-}


In our case, 6 dimensions is easy. It's just the three coordinates for the current position of the particle, and three more describing the direction it's headed. :)
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Message 39476 - Posted: 1 Aug 2019, 7:27:33 UTC - in response to Message 39475.  

Fortran have max. 7 Dimensiones, when remember correct (Fortran77) ;-)
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Message 39690 - Posted: 23 Aug 2019, 6:52:29 UTC - in response to Message 39476.  

Fortran have max. 7 Dimensiones, when remember correct (Fortran77) ;-)


I believe Fortran 2008, which we use, has a maximum rank of 15.

In any case, 6 coordinates for our particles means that we need n x 6 of storage for n particles. So only rank 2 if we were to use a single array for it.
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Message 39699 - Posted: 23 Aug 2019, 10:24:35 UTC

After you run Sixtracks for a while you will get used to those 30 second WU's

I have been seeing thousands of them since 2004 which means there must be at least a million so far but it is nice to have them finish and start running new ones without wasting time like VB tasks have done once or twice
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Message boards : Sixtrack Application : Very short WU


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