Message boards : Number crunching : Graphical interfase
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Miquel Pericas

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Message 15141 - Posted: 19 Oct 2006, 21:35:37 UTC

I think it could be good to have a graphical interfase to see what are we computing with our computers. Other projects had it and it's reallly interesting. Are you thinking on develope it?
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Message 15144 - Posted: 20 Oct 2006, 0:24:31 UTC

This project actually does have rather nice-looking graphics. The graphics, though, do not really represent the actual data being crunched (it's just a simulation), although there is a progress bar.

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Miquel Pericas

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Message 15149 - Posted: 21 Oct 2006, 12:03:39 UTC - in response to Message 15144.  

This project actually does have rather nice-looking graphics. The graphics, though, do not really represent the actual data being crunched (it's just a simulation), although there is a progress bar.



Ok. Thanks for your answer! :D



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Message 15150 - Posted: 21 Oct 2006, 13:32:45 UTC

Just a quick question here, as I cannot remember if it has been covered in previous postings --

Does running the graphical display have any effect on the processing speed of the computer? Has there been any definitive testing wherein a set of units were processed by a machine running the graphics, and then processed again with graphics disabled? If so, what were the results?

Personal thought here - with older machines, I would assume there would be a significant impact, but the newer machines, and machines with high level graphic cards would probably see less impact.

This is just my curiousity acting up, as I run all my machines in the 'as a service' mode, which precludes the operation of the graphics display ...


If I've lived this long, I've gotta be that old
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Gaspode the UnDressed

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Message 15151 - Posted: 21 Oct 2006, 18:31:04 UTC - in response to Message 15150.  

Just a quick question here, as I cannot remember if it has been covered in previous postings --

Does running the graphical display have any effect on the processing speed of the computer? Has there been any definitive testing wherein a set of units were processed by a machine running the graphics, and then processed again with graphics disabled? If so, what were the results?

Personal thought here - with older machines, I would assume there would be a significant impact, but the newer machines, and machines with high level graphic cards would probably see less impact.

This is just my curiousity acting up, as I run all my machines in the 'as a service' mode, which precludes the operation of the graphics display ...


It is inevitable that running any sort of process will affect number crunching performance. The exact effect of this will very according to the needs of each process, and the hardware available to service it.

In the case of the LHC screen saver the parameters affecting the screen saver can be adjusted by the user on an interactive basis. However, it incorporates an auto-pilot mode that resets the parameters to a minimal demand level once the user stops fiddling.

I suppose that you could measure the effect of running the screen saver in autopilot, but this measurement would only be valid for the precise architecture on which it is measured. You could measure it across a range of different machines and architectures to get an average, but what would be the point? Diehard crunchers will almost always choose a configuration that maximises crunching performance. For those who want to run the screen saver the crunching performance is probably secondary.


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Message 15152 - Posted: 21 Oct 2006, 18:31:14 UTC - in response to Message 15150.  
Last modified: 21 Oct 2006, 18:41:24 UTC

Does running the graphical display have any effect on the processing speed of the computer? Has there been any definitive testing wherein a set of units were processed by a machine running the graphics, and then processed again with graphics disabled?


It makes a difference.

The slower your cpu is, the bigger the difference it makes. Running Einstein on a 667 MHz cpu it would not complete a wu in a week with the s/s running, meaning missed deadlines & no credit; it returned results in under a day with graphics disabled.

The GPU makes a huge difference on projects like Einstein where the s/s has no relation to what is being crunched. That rotating spere is all done by the GPU so long as you have 3d graphics on the card.

It is less help on a project like Rosetta or CPDN where the model is represented on the screen. On these projects the science keeps being interrupted to be asked for the most recent data to be turned into graphics, some of which processing has to be done in the main cpu. And the data transfer blocks the ram bus from the cpu while the gpu is grabbing the new data as well. However even on these projects a 3d gpu is better than not having one.

Some people have looked at using the GPU as an extra processor, and you certainly would not want to be running real graphics at the same time as that - but that is well of topic...


This is just my curiousity acting up, as I run all my machines in the 'as a service' mode, which precludes the operation of the graphics display ...


I recently discovered (here) how to get graphics with service mode. However it is not recommended by MS who say it is a security risk.

R~~
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Message boards : Number crunching : Graphical interfase


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