Message boards : LHC@home Science : Strength of glass on the moon
Message board moderation

To post messages, you must log in.

AuthorMessage
Ernesto Solis

Send message
Joined: 22 Aug 05
Posts: 100
Credit: 6,864
RAC: 0
Message 14623 - Posted: 5 Sep 2006, 8:47:23 UTC
Last modified: 5 Sep 2006, 8:49:53 UTC

Does anyone know:

What is the strength of glass on the moon?
How would Aerogel conpare to glass on the moon?

How can the two(Glass and Aerogel) strengthen a space station and where on the station can they be applied?

What in your opinions is the best material for
space station construction?

Simple minds want to know
Ernie S
Team Art Bell
God Bless
ID: 14623 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Gaspode the UnDressed

Send message
Joined: 1 Sep 04
Posts: 506
Credit: 118,619
RAC: 0
Message 14624 - Posted: 5 Sep 2006, 11:03:11 UTC - in response to Message 14623.  

Ernesto

I think you have muddled the concepts here.

The strength of materials is not generally affected by a lunar (or any other) environment, so the strenght of glass is the same on the Moon as it is here. There may be long term effects associated with degradation in a space environment caused by radiation, micro-meteorites, etc. The main strength of glass is in tension, so glass fibres could perhaps be used where a tensile load is to be carried. Kevlar probably provides a better strength to weight ratio, and since weight is the key determinant in launch costs, glass wouldn't be used. So, beyond it's obvious use as a component in windows I don't see that there be much use for it.

Aerogel is a silicon based substance, and there the similarity to glass largely stops. Although it has a density approaching that of air, it is extremely porous. You wouldn't use it for windows unless you wanted all your air to leak through it.
You can get more details about Aerogel on the NASA web site.


Gaspode the UnDressed
http://www.littlevale.co.uk
ID: 14624 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
darkpella

Send message
Joined: 11 Sep 05
Posts: 17
Credit: 306,100
RAC: 0
Message 14630 - Posted: 8 Sep 2006, 9:33:50 UTC - in response to Message 14624.  


Aerogel is a silicon based substance, and there the similarity to glass largely stops. Although it has a density approaching that of air, it is extremely porous. You wouldn't use it for windows unless you wanted all your air to leak through it.
You can get more details about Aerogel on the NASA web site.



Well, actually you would if heat dispersion though fluid convection is an issue, as it is, for example, for household windows
It would anyway be necessary to seal it between two layers of some kind of glass, to avoid air leakage thorugh the aerogle layer and, possibly, its damaging though environmental agents (dust, wind) but the heat conduction though this aerogel layer would be almost none. Put an aerogel layer on your roof as well and you'll get an almost adiabatic house, needing much less energy both for heating and for air conditioning. This, in turn, would also make much more feasible to heat or refrigerate a house though geothermal gauges possibly driven by solar energy, hence with no fossile fuel consumption for heating and air conditioning (and a fair long term saving on energy bills!)
ID: 14630 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Gaspode the UnDressed

Send message
Joined: 1 Sep 04
Posts: 506
Credit: 118,619
RAC: 0
Message 14631 - Posted: 8 Sep 2006, 11:35:49 UTC - in response to Message 14630.  


Well, actually you would if heat dispersion though fluid convection is an issue, as it is, for example, for household windows


Good point, but I bet it's not cost effective for domestic insulation.

How many domestic windows are there on the moon?



Gaspode the UnDressed
http://www.littlevale.co.uk
ID: 14631 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Ernesto Solis

Send message
Joined: 22 Aug 05
Posts: 100
Credit: 6,864
RAC: 0
Message 14632 - Posted: 8 Sep 2006, 14:47:15 UTC - in response to Message 14631.  
Last modified: 8 Sep 2006, 14:47:36 UTC


Well, actually you would if heat dispersion though fluid convection is an issue, as it is, for example, for household windows


Good point, but I bet it's not cost effective for domestic insulation.

How many domestic windows are there on the moon?



There will be many someday!

Thanks for your imput guys
Ernie
ID: 14632 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
darkpella

Send message
Joined: 11 Sep 05
Posts: 17
Credit: 306,100
RAC: 0
Message 14640 - Posted: 14 Sep 2006, 8:49:28 UTC - in response to Message 14631.  
Last modified: 14 Sep 2006, 8:50:52 UTC


Well, actually you would if heat dispersion though fluid convection is an issue, as it is, for example, for household windows


Good point, but I bet it's not cost effective for domestic insulation.


One of TEFLON's first applications was Apollo spaceship thermal shield, and it was not cost effective either, now there's a TEFLON layer on every non-sticking pan...


How many domestic windows are there on the moon?


Not many, indeed, and even if they were, there's almost no atmosphere on the moon, hence heat dispersion through a convection/conduction scheme is not at all an issue....

ID: 14640 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile anarchic teapot

Send message
Joined: 15 Feb 06
Posts: 67
Credit: 403,747
RAC: 4
Message 14641 - Posted: 14 Sep 2006, 17:13:23 UTC - in response to Message 14640.  

there's almost no atmosphere on the moon

I see a business opportunity. Let's go found a discotheque up there!



Ah, is that my coat?

sQuonk
Plague of Mice
Intel Core i3-9100 CPU@3.60 GHz, but it's doing its bit just the same.
ID: 14641 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Ernesto Solis

Send message
Joined: 22 Aug 05
Posts: 100
Credit: 6,864
RAC: 0
Message 14643 - Posted: 15 Sep 2006, 5:43:59 UTC

Anyway, what you want to do Ernie is not take glass to the moon, but make it there! I'm not sure what firing a few megajoules ( that you got from solar power ) through lunar dust does, but maybe it'll vitrify ( become glass-like ). :-)

Spot on! NASA's having a contest (MoonROx, the Moon Regolith Oxygen competition) to see who can build a device to extract 5 Kg of breathable oxygen from lunar simulant in only 8 hours. One technique (pyrolysis) utilizes concentrated solar energy (sunlight focused with a lens) to heat the lunar simulant, and what's leftover is '"slag", a low-oxygen, highly metallic, often glassy material', and it would make a good raw material for 'bricks, pavement, or radiation shielding'

from friends at Einstein@home(Chipper & Mike)
Just sharing info guys,
thanks
Ernie S
ID: 14643 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote

Message boards : LHC@home Science : Strength of glass on the moon


©2021 CERN