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David C.

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Message 9017 - Posted: 29 Jul 2005, 7:33:16 UTC
Last modified: 29 Jul 2005, 7:36:21 UTC

It seems like the project has been going for quite some time now, albeit only recently has the number of accounts been allowed to increase quite a bit.

I'm wondering if there is anywhere we can see the results of our computations? I understand that we are simply calculating run throughs under different conditions to find the best condition for operation, but are there any research papers to read that talk about the results thus far? I know that every now and then, the project is paused while physicists analyze the results - is there any way we could read about the results of this analysis?

-David
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Profile Fuzzy Hollynoodles
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Message 9027 - Posted: 29 Jul 2005, 17:43:16 UTC - in response to Message 9017.  

Look [url=http://lhcathome.cern.ch/forum_thread.php?id=1511]here.<a>


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Profile David C Thompson

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Message 9030 - Posted: 29 Jul 2005, 22:37:26 UTC - in response to Message 9027.  

Also check sites like BOINCStats.com to see how much total computation has been done. I have no affiliation with them, other than using their site to check the stats of each project.

> Look [url=http://lhcathome.cern.ch/forum_thread.php?id=1511]here.<a>

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<a href="http://www.davidcthompson.com">David C Thompson</a>, intellectual property law.

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David C.

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Message 9097 - Posted: 2 Aug 2005, 6:53:01 UTC

Well, what I really meant is not how many units of computation the project has done, but what the actual result is of that computation. i.e. what did it tell us? The article about picking up signals seems like something that doesn't really explicitly cite our computation efforts, and I'm wondering if there are any like formal papers that talk about what scientists can infer from the data we've computed.
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John McLeod VII
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Message 9125 - Posted: 2 Aug 2005, 22:40:14 UTC - in response to Message 9097.  

> Well, what I really meant is not how many units of computation the project has
> done, but what the actual result is of that computation. i.e. what did it tell
> us? The article about picking up signals seems like something that doesn't
> really explicitly cite our computation efforts, and I'm wondering if there are
> any like formal papers that talk about what scientists can infer from the data
> we've computed.
>
The scientists are using our work in order to make certain that the magnets in the Large Hadron Collider are aimed correctly, and also so that they will know when a beam is unstable and that it needs to be dumped.


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Message 9128 - Posted: 3 Aug 2005, 3:58:16 UTC

They take the results from a bunch of computers and put them in a scatter plot to see how 'stable' the path was.

http://athome.web.cern.ch/athome/LHCathome/whatis.html

Of course, sixtrack is just a mathematical approximation of the actual collider.
In the real world is where magnetic fields in magnets are slightly different, positions of objects are slightly different.

If you really want to see how good the 'stable' numbers are, you could try the numbers out in a 'slightly off' model (ie.. a few magnets are off by an inch or two, and the gain of the controller that controls the magnetic fields vary by 1%)

It reminds me of some mechanical engineering classes I had where you have to predict if a column would buckle. Basically, you assume the beam is bent by a 'delta' amount, and that 'delta times the vertical force' is the bending moment for the beam, and therefore you can calculate if the beam will buckle.


I'm not the LHC Alex. Just a number cruncher like everyone else here.
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Message 9228 - Posted: 8 Aug 2005, 18:06:35 UTC

I think David means that just computing without results for the people that have spent the cycles gets boring somehow. If this is not his opinion it's still mine.


I would be glad if it would be handled a bit more like an other DC project, in words "Muon1 Distributed Particle Accelerator Design" by Stephen Brooks from PPARC.

www.stephenbrooks.org/muon1

There you exactly see what has changed and how much your computations improved the machine and that's it what the donors make happy :-). You can also change specific values of the machine setup and test it. That's cool and more interesting but I think that's not managable with this project.
So, let's hope that we get at least some scientific output, anytime.
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