21) Message boards : LHC@home Science : Stanford Accelerator Expertise at Work in the LHC (Message 21739)
Posted 10 Dec 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:
CERN\'s Large Hadron Collider became the world\'s highest energy particle collider when it began colliding protons at 1.18 tera-electron volts late last month. This was no small feat; it takes hundreds of mechanical and software systems to run such a machine—including a system governing the radio frequency waves that give particles their boost inside the accelerator. With their combined 25 years of experience on just such a system, a SLAC team of researchers helped CERN solve an unanticipated complexity with this LHC system, helping get the giant machine up and running.

\\\"Our team is the place where technology and accelerator physics come together,\" said SLAC accelerator physicist John Fox. \"We know particle beams and their dynamics, we have technical expertise with accelerator RF systems and feedback, and we’ve learned a lot understanding their interaction.\\\" Under Fox\'s leadership, SLAC researchers Dan Van Winkle, Themis Mastoridis and Claudio Rivetta used their knowledge of RF systems to design new software tools needed to commission and optimize the LHC RF system.

As in other accelerators, it\'s very important to keep both the LHC\'s beam and RF systems stable. The RF system governs the radio waves that push particles to ever higher energies, much as ocean waves help a surfer gain speed. But if an RF system is unstable or poorly optimized to the particle beam, it can inadvertently change the beam\'s shape or trajectory. These systems are very complex and require constant observation and adjustment—even more so at the LHC than at most other accelerators. Particles enter the LHC at a relatively low energy and then ramp up to the target collision energy. Substantial RF adjustments are needed throughout this ramp-up process.


More . . .
22) Message boards : LHC@home Science : Images of today's collisions (Message 21733)
Posted 9 Dec 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:


First 2.36 TeV Collision Events recorded, December 8th, 2009
23) Message boards : Cafe LHC : Crunch WCG until LHC@Home gets running. . . . (Message 21724)
Posted 7 Dec 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:
World Community Grid setting new records:


Full size image link


Saturday and Sunday had all time day of week records and the 7 day sliding was upped to 2,138 CPU years... 305.4 CPU years daily average.

--Sekerob
Community Advisor


Link
24) Message boards : LHC@home Science : Images of today's collisions (Message 21720)
Posted 6 Dec 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:
Images of today's collisions:

25) Message boards : LHC@home Science : Cern Using Twitter for LHC Updates (Message 21717)
Posted 6 Dec 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:

CERN LHC Updates on Twitter!



Memories of the first CMS collisions
26) Message boards : LHC@home Science : The LHC produces first physics results (Message 21714)
Posted 5 Dec 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:
After 20 years in the making, the first physics results have come out of the European Organization for Nuclear Research's (CERN) Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Physicists from the University of Birmingham played a key role in analyzing these collisions and producing the first results from the 27 km circular atom smasher near Geneva.

"I'm immensely proud of the team who have worked so hard", said David Evans, United Kingdom spokesman for the Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) collaboration. "They have been working around the clock at CERN in order to get these results out so quick."

"This is great news," said Keith Mason, from the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) in the United Kingdom. "The LHC is now fully on track and gearing up to some unique and possibly world changing science. We're very proud of the huge contribution of our skilled scientists here in the UK."


More . . .
27) Message boards : LHC@home Science : The LHC: What price the secrets of the universe? (Message 21713)
Posted 5 Dec 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:


What price the secrets of the universe?

It may be costly to send protons whizzing round the Large Hadron Collider, but such research is a good investment.



Economies are underpinned by scientific research and scientists. Now is exactly the right time to invest more in curiosity-driven research, and although this might sound counterintuitive during the global recession, certainly there is historical precedence. Franklin Roosevelt instigated investment in basic research funding during the Great Depression, with a three-fold increase in the public science budget in the six years up to 1940, which resulted in unparalleled technological development as part of the New Deal. Japan emerged in the 1980s as a technological superpower, but the Japanese economy collapsed in 1990. Basic research was seen as a way out of the slump, and science was placed front and centre in Japanese policymaking. It is now in its third five-year plan, increasing funding to basic research each time.

And just in case anyone is tempted, don\\\'t trot out the old cliche about the only practical spin-offs from the very expensive Apollo missions being Velcro and Teflon. Forget the immeasurable inspirational effect that landing on the moon had, creating a generation of scientists and engineers: proper economic analysis indicated that for every dollar spent on Apollo, $14 were returned to the economy. The business gurus in Dragon\\\'s Den would be drooling at that kind of deal.

Next year, the scientists at the LHC will ignore the advice of the Ghostbusters, and will deliberately cross the streams of protons whizzing round the 27km tunnel at 99.99% the speed of light. When they start getting some results, they may yield an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in the universe. That should be enough to justify the phenomenal spend. Where\\\'s your sense of wonder? But if not, the data is unequivocal. The LHC emphatically exemplifies the solid notion that basic research results in economic growth.


More . . .

28) Message boards : LHC@home Science : Cern Using Twitter for LHC Updates (Message 21711)
Posted 5 Dec 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:

CERN LHC Updates on Twitter!




The LHC team is planning to collide protons in the LHC for several hours tomorrow, and the next few days after. The goal is to provide the experiments with their first million collisions (a few weeks ago we had only a few hundred). We need millions of collisions just to start to calibrate the detector, and to re-discover some of the well known particles (that will be created in the collisions via E=mc^2) and prove our detectors are working correctly.

There are a few differences between the upcoming collisions and the first collisions a few weeks ago. First, there will be more protons in the LHC (probably about 4 billion protons in each “bunch” of protons, with 4 bunches simultaneously going in each direction around the LHC). Second, the LHC teams have been carefully studying the beams in the LHC in the last few weeks so the bunches of protons should be better packed together. This will decrease the number of protons straying away into the beam pipe, allowing the beams to stay in the machine for hours, and leading to more collisions.

CERN closes December 18 for a few weeks, and we won’t have beams back in the LHC until at least February. While we wait, we will analyze the data collected in the next few weeks. Then the LHC will ramp up the energy of the beams and we will have billions and billions of collisions through the rest of 2010.


More . . .
29) Message boards : Cafe LHC : The Benefit of Discovering the Higg's Boson (Message 21699)
Posted 1 Dec 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:
The greatest discovery of the LHC will be how matter is formed from energy.


If the Higgs boson is found, theoretical particle physics will have filled in a huge blank space in our knowledge of matter and energy.

. . . but that is still a massive \'if\' . . . .

30) Message boards : Team invites : NEW MEMBER to BOINCstats (Message 21696)
Posted 30 Nov 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:
Okay you can count me in. I just joined the BOINCstats team.

NAGILUM

Memory Alpha - in the Morgana Quadrant




31) Message boards : Number crunching : one for all (Message 21695)
Posted 30 Nov 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:
So, all this talk about lhc is up and whatnot, is it really, is it producing work for us ? or is all the work beeing diverted to somewhere else ?
Is it time for us to give up and remove this project from our project list ?

Hoping to get an involved person to tell us, no just some ramdom troll ....

The answer is in the apologies thread in the café, especially the bigmac posts. He is not a \\\"ramdom troll\\\". Read and you will know. You might be required to think about the answers though.




As long as this website is up, I hold out hope that the BOINC community will be involved in LHC science.

. . . if CERN can keep the LHC running, the need for computer cycles to deal with the data produced will stagger the imagination.

32) Message boards : LHC@home Science : Cern Using Twitter for LHC Updates (Message 21693)
Posted 30 Nov 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:

CERN LHC Updates on Twitter!




LHC set world record for beam energy last night. Twin beams circulated at 1.18 TeV.

. . .for more see http://bit.ly/6zOkVR
33) Message boards : LHC@home Science : Cern Using Twitter for LHC Updates (Message 21691)
Posted 28 Nov 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:

CERN LHC Updates on Twitter!




Steve Myers video interview on seven remarkable seven days for CERN http://bit.ly/6WSnvS
34) Message boards : LHC@home Science : Cern Using Twitter for LHC Updates (Message 21678)
Posted 25 Nov 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:

CERN LHC Updates on Twitter!
35) Message boards : LHC@home Science : LHC@Home name is misleading because no collider data available to BOINC (Message 21540)
Posted 8 Oct 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:
Give a look to the CernVM thread in the Number Crunching Section. I would not be surprised if some data could arrive to us poor fellows, like the crumbles fallen to dogs after the children have eaten in a Gospel parable.
Tullio



If no more LHC work is in the pipeline, why would they keep this website going?

. . . if CERN can keep their Mother of All Science Fair Projects running, it will produce mass quantities of raw data to process.

I am pretty sure that there will be plenty to go around.


36) Message boards : LHC@home Science : LHC Update: 2 October 2009 (Message 21535)
Posted 7 Oct 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:



So, there is some hope that <i>\\\\\\\"The Work Will Flow\\\\\\\"</i> in the near future?



From everything that I can gather, the LHC will be starting up sometime in November at 1/2 power.

If/When there will be any meaningful work here to crunch is the $64K?

. . . but I am pretty sure that LHC@Home will eventually have mass quantities of work to pass out to the wide world of BOINC.
37) Message boards : LHC@home Science : LHC Update: 2 October 2009 (Message 21525)
Posted 3 Oct 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:

LHC Update: October 2, 2009

October 2, 2009 | 12:00 pm

Today’s issue of the CERN Bulletin reports more progress in readying the LHC for restart. Six of the Large Hadron Collider’s eight sectors are now at operating temperature (1.9 K), and current is flowing in three sectors’ superconducting magnets. The whole LHC is predicted to be at operating temperatures in two weeks.

The chain of accelerators that leads up to the LHC is ready and performing well, as demonstrated by tests carried out last weekend. Particles were extracted from the SPS, the last accelerator before the LHC, and injected into the transfer lines that link the SPS and LHC. Lead ions have also been accelerated up to the entrance of the LHC for the first time.

Also in this issue of the Bulletin, updates on the status of the four major LHC experiments: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb; visits to the LHC by Steven Hawking and author Bill Bryson; and the results of an impromptu survey on CERN and the LHC in the laboratory’s local community.

Katie Yurkewicz
38) Message boards : LHC@home Science : Is the LHC already obsolete? (Message 20937)
Posted 9 Jan 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:
Is the LHC already obsolete?

Alternate collision method suggests LHC may have been total waste of $9 billion


No. Did you read the article? No? Thought not.

Why do you always post in BOLD you numbnuts?

Al.




Glad to see you haven\'t changed a bit. . . .
39) Message boards : LHC@home Science : Is the LHC already obsolete? (Message 20908)
Posted 7 Jan 2009 by Profile Sid
Post:
Is the LHC already obsolete?

Alternate collision method suggests LHC may have been total waste of $9 billion




There is an article on NewScientist.com that might seem astounding. It basically states that laser-based, desktop-sized atom smashers could be as effective or more at probing the secrets of the universe as the $9 billion Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland, but for a tiny fraction of the cost.


More . . .
40) Message boards : Cafe LHC : No new tasks??? (Message 20854)
Posted 9 Dec 2008 by Profile Sid
Post:
FYI the only reason we are getting work at all is due to the malfunction of the LHC. LHC@home helps design the collider NOT process the data gathered from the collisions and probably never will. The admins have stated numerous times that the data sets would be to large to distribute over the internet. They have purchased some supercomputers for that.



That is really disappointing.

. . . from everything I have been able to gather about the LHC, it\'s appetite for computer cycles would be almost beyond the capabilities of modern computer science to provide.

. . . that is of course if CERN can keep it running.


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